Jesus Is _____

Jesus is a book I was incredibly excited to read, and it delivered. It was an interesting book  that addressed many of the incorrect stereotypes that exist within and outside of the Christian Community. In each chapter of the book Pastor Judah Smith starts out with Jesus Is and fills in the rest of the sentence with a adjective describing who Jesus is and what his character is. This was an incredibly refreshing book, I feel like a lot of the time who Jesus is actually gets mucked up with all of the different teachings, theology, and who he is in pop culture. I thoroughly enjoyed the candid writing style that Pastor Judah Smith writes in.

I received this book through the Thomas Nelson review program 

Red Letter Christians

Shane Claiborne is one of my favorite Christian authors. I love how he focuses on social justice. I feel like in the Christian community there is to little focus on this. I love how the book focuses on the words of Jesus and his opinion on social justice. I feel like so many christians ignore what the words of Jesus say about going out and helping the poor. God calls us to give up our material goods and help the poor.

Review of your 100 day prayer

So one part of my faith life that has never been as strong as everything else is prayer. I don’t know why it hasn’t been but that’s the way it’s always been. When I had a problem instead of giving it up to God I would worry about it myself. This devotional is a wonderful devotional and helped me get my prayer life in order. This book gave me the kick in the butt that I needed. Having a devotional like this made me make sure that I sat down every night and make sure I prayed. This devotional also helped give my prayer a direction that it didn’t have before because of the prompts in the book. I would recommend this book for anyone that there prayer life needs a kick in the butt.

Review of lessons learned as a bridesmaid

This is a wonderful book that I think every single lady should read. Single ladies are told these days are told that they should pray for their future husband, but we are never told how to prepare ourselves to be a Godly wife. Which is what I needed myself, as a single mother I hope to one day meet a Godly man and get married. This book was a pretty quick and easy read and engaging, I enjoyed how the author talked about her past relationships and her experiences as a bridesmaid, this made it much more relatable and more engaging. I also liked the study guides at the end of each chapter, I think the study guides would be more helpful for a study group but I did some of them myself. I really wish there was more books out there like this, this book is a wonderful book and I would recommend it to any young single lady.

Heaven is For Real

So I got excited when I saw that booksneeze would be getting the book Heaven is for real, I had been wanting to read it for the longest time and I had heard nothing but good things about the book from my friends who have read the book, and man did it not disappoint. This book is about a boy who is four and gets appendicitis and his appendix burst, the boy goes in for surgery and isn’t supposed to make it but he does, when he wakes up from surgery he has wonderful story of how he visited heaven. The wonderful thing about the story is that it’s all true. This book is exactly what I needed, I have faith in God but I have always wondered about heaven, I am a doubting Tomas as some people would say. I have always wondered if all of the talk about heaven was real and almost considered my beliefs fire insurance, but this book has renewed my faith and has made me see how I have it all wrong. I truly believe in heaven now and this book has made me see, the vivid imagery has been what really helped me. I would recommend this book for any believer, whether or not they feel they need this book.

Stained Glass hearts

Stained glass hearts Seeing life from a broken perspective is a wonderful book. It talks about our brokenness and how every single person is broken, even if we pretend we are fine. The book reminds us how God will heal our brokenness no matter how broken we are. This was a wonderful book and was a blessing for me because I am a broken person and I forget that sometimes I am broken and that I can always trust God with my brokenness and that he will be able to heal me no matter what. I know I have been going through trouble lately and I haven’t been trusting God with my problems lately even though I know I should. This book has reminded me that I can put my faith into God and that he can be able to heal all of my hurt. I think every person should read this book because everyone has hurt and problems because we are all broken from the fall. I know so often people go to church and hide behind religion and don’t seek a relationship with Jesus where he is able to heal our broken hearts. This is a wonderful book for everyone.

Review of Don’t Check Your Brains At The Door

I received the book “Don’t Check Your Brains At The Door”  by Josh McDowell and Bob Hostetler through booksneeze.com to review. I thought that it is a wonderful apologetics book, for someone who is new in their faith, it rebukes many myths of the faith and would be helpful for someone who is just now learning about the christian faith. Although for someone like me who is more mature in their faith I didn’t benefit much from it, except for it me to be able to better answer some questions about the Christian faith better. I think it would also be helpful for teens who are a little bit more mature in their faith to help be better evangelists to other teens who are not Christians. The answers that it had to many common questions and myths of the christian faith would be helpful because it is honestly so hard to answer some of the people have about the christian faith. If you are looking for a good apologetics book targeted towards teens this is a wonderful book. There seem to be very few good apologetics books for teens out there, since that is the group of people that seem to need God the most.

Reblog if you live here!

I want to follow all of you!

It is a seriously awesome state

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doctorsage:

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hotstop:

Mister Rogers and the Dalai Lama

15 Reasons Mister Rogers Was the Best Neighbor Ever 
 
1. Even Koko the Gorilla Loved Him
Most people have heard of Koko, the Stanford-educated gorilla who could speak about 1000 words in American Sign Language, and understand about 2000 in English. What most people don’t know, however, is that Koko was an avid Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood fan. As Esquire reported, when Fred Rogers took a trip out to meet Koko for his show, not only did she immediately wrap her arms around him and embrace him, she did what she’d always seen him do onscreen: she proceeded to take his shoes off!
 
2. He Made Thieves Think Twice
According to a TV Guide profile, Fred Rogers drove a plain old Impala for years. One day, however, the car was stolen from the street near the TV station. When Rogers filed a police report, the story was picked up by every newspaper, radio and media outlet around town. Amazingly, within 48 hours the car was left in the exact spot where it was taken from, with an apology on the dashboard. It read, “If we’d known it was yours, we never would have taken it.”
3. He Watched His Figure to the Pound
In covering Rogers’ daily routine (waking up at 5; praying for a few hours for all of his friends and family; studying; writing, making calls and reaching out to every fan who took the time to write him; going for a morning swim; getting on a scale; then really starting his day), writer Tom Junod explained that Mr. Rogers weighed in at exactly 143 pounds every day for the last 30 years of his life. He didn’t smoke, didn’t drink, didn’t eat the flesh of any animals, and was extremely disciplined in his daily routine. And while I’m not sure if any of that was because he’d mostly grown up a chubby, single child, Junod points out that Rogers found beauty in the number 143. According to the piece, Rogers came “to see that number as a gift… because, as he says, “the number 143 means ‘I love you.’ It takes one letter to say ‘I’ and four letters to say ‘love’ and three letters to say ‘you.’ One hundred and forty-three.”
4. He Saved Both Public Television and the VCR
Strange but true. When the government wanted to cut Public Television funds in 1969, the relatively unknown Mister Rogers went to Washington. Almost straight out of a Capra film, his 5-6 minute testimony on how TV had the potential to give kids hope and create more productive citizens was so simple but passionate that even the most gruff politicians were charmed. While the budget should have been cut, the funding instead jumped from $9 to $22 million. Rogers also spoke to Congress, and swayed senators into voting to allow VCR’s to record television shows from the home. It was a cantankerous debate at the time, but his argument was that recording a program like his allowed working parents to sit down with their children and watch shows as a family.
5. He Might Have Been the Most Tolerant American Ever
Mister Rogers seems to have been almost exactly the same off-screen as he was onscreen. As an ordained Presbyterian minister, and a man of tremendous faith, Mister Rogers preached tolerance first. Whenever he was asked to castigate non-Christians or gays for their differing beliefs, he would instead face them and say, with sincerity, “God loves you just the way you are.” Often this provoked ire from fundamentalists.
6. He Was Genuinely Curious About Others
Mister Rogers was known as one of the toughest interviews because he’d often befriend reporters, asking them tons of questions, taking pictures of them, compiling an album for them at the end of their time together, and calling them after to check in on them and hear about their families. He wasn’t concerned with himself, and genuinely loved hearing the life stories of others. Amazingly, it wasn’t just with reporters. Once, on a fancy trip up to a PBS exec’s house, he heard the limo driver was going to wait outside for 2 hours, so he insisted the driver come in and join them (which flustered the host). On the way back, Rogers sat up front, and when he learned that they were passing the driver’s home on the way, he asked if they could stop in to meet his family. According to the driver, it was one of the best nights of his life—the house supposedly lit up when Rogers arrived, and he played jazz piano and bantered with them late into the night. Further, like with the reporters, Rogers sent him notes and kept in touch with the driver for the rest of his life.
7. He Was Color-blind
Literally. He couldn’t see the color blue. Of course, he was also figuratively color-blind, as you probably guessed. As were his parents who took in a black foster child when Rogers was growing up.
8. He Could Make a Subway Car full of Strangers Sing
Once while rushing to a New York meeting, there were no cabs available, so Rogers and one of his colleagues hopped on the subway. Esquire reported that the car was filled with people, and they assumed they wouldn’t be noticed. But when the crowd spotted Rogers, they all simultaneously burst into song, chanting “It’s a beautiful day in the neighborhood.” The result made Rogers smile wide.
A few more things about him…
9. He Got into TV Because He Hated TV. The first time he turned one on, he saw people angrily throwing pies in each other’s faces. He immediately vowed to use the medium for better than that. Over the years he covered topics as varied as why kids shouldn’t be scared of a haircut, or the bathroom drain (because you won’t fit!), to divorce and war.
10. He Was an Ivy League Dropout. Rogers moved from Dartmouth to Rollins College to pursue his studies in music.
11. He Composed all the Songs on the Show, and over 200 tunes.
12. He Was a perfectionist, and Disliked Ad Libbing. He felt he owed it to children to make sure every word on his show was thought out.
13. Michael Keaton Got His Start on the Show as an assistant — helping puppeteer and operate the trolley.
14. Several Characters on the Show are Named for His Family.Queen Sara is named after Rogers’ wife, and the postman Mr. McFeely is named for his maternal grandfather who always talked to him like an adult, and reminded young Fred that he made every day special just by being himself. Sound familiar? It was the same way Mister Rogers closed every show.15. The Sweaters. Every one of the cardigans he wore on the show had been hand-knit by his mother.

Instant Reblog. Instant. Instant. Instant. Mr. Rogers is awesome! 

TRUTH: I cried when I heard he died.

I remember that trolley…

I feel like crying now. ;-;

This man was a huge part of my childhood and I was incredibly sad to see him go. RIP Mister Rogers.

doctorsage:

janedoodles:

kelvin-2sita:

seandackermann:

hotstop:

Mister Rogers and the Dalai Lama


15 Reasons Mister Rogers Was the Best Neighbor Ever 

1. Even Koko the Gorilla Loved Him

Most people have heard of Koko, the Stanford-educated gorilla who could speak about 1000 words in American Sign Language, and understand about 2000 in English. What most people don’t know, however, is that Koko was an avid Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood fan. As Esquire reported, when Fred Rogers took a trip out to meet Koko for his show, not only did she immediately wrap her arms around him and embrace him, she did what she’d always seen him do onscreen: she proceeded to take his shoes off!

2. He Made Thieves Think Twice

According to a TV Guide profile, Fred Rogers drove a plain old Impala for years. One day, however, the car was stolen from the street near the TV station. When Rogers filed a police report, the story was picked up by every newspaper, radio and media outlet around town. Amazingly, within 48 hours the car was left in the exact spot where it was taken from, with an apology on the dashboard. It read, “If we’d known it was yours, we never would have taken it.”

3. He Watched His Figure to the Pound

In covering Rogers’ daily routine (waking up at 5; praying for a few hours for all of his friends and family; studying; writing, making calls and reaching out to every fan who took the time to write him; going for a morning swim; getting on a scale; then really starting his day), writer Tom Junod explained that Mr. Rogers weighed in at exactly 143 pounds every day for the last 30 years of his life. He didn’t smoke, didn’t drink, didn’t eat the flesh of any animals, and was extremely disciplined in his daily routine. And while I’m not sure if any of that was because he’d mostly grown up a chubby, single child, Junod points out that Rogers found beauty in the number 143. According to the piece, Rogers came “to see that number as a gift… because, as he says, “the number 143 means ‘I love you.’ It takes one letter to say ‘I’ and four letters to say ‘love’ and three letters to say ‘you.’ One hundred and forty-three.”

4. He Saved Both Public Television and the VCR

Strange but true. When the government wanted to cut Public Television funds in 1969, the relatively unknown Mister Rogers went to Washington. Almost straight out of a Capra film, his 5-6 minute testimony on how TV had the potential to give kids hope and create more productive citizens was so simple but passionate that even the most gruff politicians were charmed. While the budget should have been cut, the funding instead jumped from $9 to $22 million. Rogers also spoke to Congress, and swayed senators into voting to allow VCR’s to record television shows from the home. It was a cantankerous debate at the time, but his argument was that recording a program like his allowed working parents to sit down with their children and watch shows as a family.

5. He Might Have Been the Most Tolerant American Ever

Mister Rogers seems to have been almost exactly the same off-screen as he was onscreen. As an ordained Presbyterian minister, and a man of tremendous faith, Mister Rogers preached tolerance first. Whenever he was asked to castigate non-Christians or gays for their differing beliefs, he would instead face them and say, with sincerity, “God loves you just the way you are.” Often this provoked ire from fundamentalists.

6. He Was Genuinely Curious About Others

Mister Rogers was known as one of the toughest interviews because he’d often befriend reporters, asking them tons of questions, taking pictures of them, compiling an album for them at the end of their time together, and calling them after to check in on them and hear about their families. He wasn’t concerned with himself, and genuinely loved hearing the life stories of others. Amazingly, it wasn’t just with reporters. Once, on a fancy trip up to a PBS exec’s house, he heard the limo driver was going to wait outside for 2 hours, so he insisted the driver come in and join them (which flustered the host). On the way back, Rogers sat up front, and when he learned that they were passing the driver’s home on the way, he asked if they could stop in to meet his family. According to the driver, it was one of the best nights of his life—the house supposedly lit up when Rogers arrived, and he played jazz piano and bantered with them late into the night. Further, like with the reporters, Rogers sent him notes and kept in touch with the driver for the rest of his life.

7. He Was Color-blind

Literally. He couldn’t see the color blue. Of course, he was also figuratively color-blind, as you probably guessed. As were his parents who took in a black foster child when Rogers was growing up.

8. He Could Make a Subway Car full of Strangers Sing

Once while rushing to a New York meeting, there were no cabs available, so Rogers and one of his colleagues hopped on the subway. Esquire reported that the car was filled with people, and they assumed they wouldn’t be noticed. But when the crowd spotted Rogers, they all simultaneously burst into song, chanting “It’s a beautiful day in the neighborhood.” The result made Rogers smile wide.

A few more things about him…

9. He Got into TV Because He Hated TV. The first time he turned one on, he saw people angrily throwing pies in each other’s faces. He immediately vowed to use the medium for better than that. Over the years he covered topics as varied as why kids shouldn’t be scared of a haircut, or the bathroom drain (because you won’t fit!), to divorce and war.

10. He Was an Ivy League Dropout. Rogers moved from Dartmouth to Rollins College to pursue his studies in music.

11. He Composed all the Songs on the Show, and over 200 tunes.

12. He Was a perfectionist, and Disliked Ad Libbing. He felt he owed it to children to make sure every word on his show was thought out.

13. Michael Keaton Got His Start on the Show as an assistant — helping puppeteer and operate the trolley.


14. Several Characters on the Show are Named for His Family.Queen Sara is named after Rogers’ wife, and the postman Mr. McFeely is named for his maternal grandfather who always talked to him like an adult, and reminded young Fred that he made every day special just by being himself. Sound familiar? It was the same way Mister Rogers closed every show.

15. The Sweaters. Every one of the cardigans he wore on the show had been hand-knit by his mother.

Instant Reblog. Instant. Instant. Instant. Mr. Rogers is awesome! 

TRUTH: I cried when I heard he died.

I remember that trolley…

I feel like crying now. ;-;

This man was a huge part of my childhood and I was incredibly sad to see him go. RIP Mister Rogers.

(via podtoid)

NIGHTNIGHT by DEDDY